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Kusmartono, 2007. Livest. Res. Rural Dev., 19 (2)

Document reference 
Kusmartono, 2007. Effects of supplementing Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus L) wastes with urea or Gliricidia/cassava leaves on growth, rumen digestion and feed degradability of sheep fed on rice straw basal diet. Livest. Res. Rural Dev., 19 (2)
Abstract 

Eighteen growing fat-tailed sheep (Experiment 1) with an average initial body weight of 25.5 kg (3.36 kg) and three rumen fistulated sheep (Experiment 2) with an average initial body weight of 34.9 kg (4.79 kg) were used in a growth trial and metabolism study, respectively. They were placed in metabolism cages and subjected to the following treatments: JFW-MUB=Rice straw (ad lib)+Jackfruit wastes (ad lib)+Molasses-Urea-Block (ad lib); JFW-MUBG=JFW-MUB+gliricidia leaves hay (3% of body weight); JFW-MUBC=JFW-MUB+cassava leaves hay (3% of body weight). Parameters measured in Experiment 1. were feed intake and daily gain, whilst feed intake, digestibility, feed degradability, rumen pH, concentrations of volatile fatty acids and nitrogen retention were measured in Experiment 2. Data obtained were statistically analysed using a Randomized Block Design (Experiment 2). The results showed that intake of JFW was dominant and ranged from 58 up to 70% of total dry matter intake. Crude protein intake (Experiment 1) and crude protein consumption and digestibility (Experiment 2) were increased significantly (P<0.05) by supplementating either gliricidia or cassava leaves hay. A similar value in crude protein digestibility was observed between sheep fed on JFW-MUBG (69.7%) and JFW-MUBC (73.0), but the amount of nitrogen retained was significantly higher in sheep fed on JFW-MUBC (22.2 g/day) than JFW-MUBG (19.22 g/day) and JFW-MUB (13.6 g/day). As a consequence, daily gain obtained was higher in sheep fed on JFW-MUBC (112.0 g/day) than JFW-MUBG (97.1 g/day) and JFW-MUB (95.6 g/day). It is concluded that supplementing JFW as energy source together with cassava leaves hay at 3% of animal's body weight as protein sources improved digestibility value of the feeds. A higher crude protein consumed and g/day) and JFW-MUB (95.6 g/day). It is concluded that supplementing JFW as energy source together with cassava leaves hay at 3% of animal's body weight as protein sources improved digestibility value of the feeds. A higher crude protein consumed and nitrogen retained in the body of sheep receiving cassava leaves hay supplementation relative to the other nitrogen source has led to a higher daily gain achieved (112 g/day) than JFW-MUBG (97.1 g/day) and JFW-MUB (95.6 g/day). An-on farm trial to evaluate the economic benefits of integrating livestock in plantations of jackfruit and cassava trees needs to be done in further experiments.

Citation key 
Kusmartono, 2007
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